George made the right decision by killing Lennie.

George must have thought he was doing the right thing or he wouldn't have done it. All the men in the lynch mob must have thought they intended to do the right thing in planning to kill Lennie.

My personal opinion is mixed. I largely disagree with the title of this essay and believe that George did the right thing, but I can also see the opposing arguments. It is simplistic to say that George has committed a crime and therefore is wrong, but one cannot always take a legal argument to deal with a moral situation.

The significance of dreams in of mice and men.

He did the right thing. he knew if the others caught him they would have tortured him. Like the scene with the dog in the middle of the book, George realizes that Lennie will be the suffering.Basically George thought that his aunt Clara would trust him and if he shot him she would of understood why he did it and that if he didn’t do it then he would just be in pain and would be beaten all the time and George wouldn’t be able to do anything about it he wanted Lennie to be happy, not in pain.So George has always done what is best for Lennie, so he did it again. He made sure that Lennie had no pain, he told lennie to think of the land and the rabbit. George made sure he shot him right in the spine and the neck to make a instant death with no pain.


George Orwell Rudyard Kipling It was a pity that Mr. Eliot should be so much on the defensive in the long essay with which he prefaces this selection of Kipling's poetry (1), but it was not to be avoided, because before one can even speak about Kipling one has to clear away a legend that has been created by two sets of people who have not read his works.The point of this scene was not to justify if George had the right to kill Lennie or not. Of course it's illegal, and not right but George did what he thought was right.

Louis Menand writes about the American diplomat George Kennan, who guided U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War, despite his admiration for Russia.

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George made the right decision by killing Lennie. His death was inevitable due to his murder of Curley’s wife. If George hadn’t killed him, Curley would eventually do it himself. Lennie would have suffered under the cruel and vengeful hands of Curley. Lennie himself was a danger to society, no matter how nice of person he is most of the time.

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While most people argue that the death penalty is the right thing to do if someone commits such a heinous crime, or that without it it would cost much more to house these criminals for life, I disagree. Though intended to punish people, the death penalty may be doing more harm than good.

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How do you — how does one, how do we — decide the right thing to do in any circumstance? Most of the time, we do things unthinkingly. We wake up, eat breakfast, get dressed, tie our shoes. We go here and there, say this and that. We make decisions as a matter of training and habit.

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George Orwell, English novelist, essayist, and critic famous for his novels Animal Farm (1945) and Nineteen Eighty-four (1949), the fictionalized but autobiographical Down and Out in Paris and London (1933), and Homage to Catalonia (1938), an account of his experiences in the Spanish Civil War.

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Spike Lee's 'Do The Right Thing' has been hailed as one of the greatest and most influential films of the hip hop generation, and in the history of cinema.

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Did George do the right thing by shooting Lennie? Is Lennie and George’s friendship equal? If not, which man benefits more? According to Of Mice and Men, what does it mean to be strong? Is George’s promise of buying a farm harmful or helpful to Lenny? How does George and Lennie’s friendship change over the course of the novel?

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Lennie may have been big, dumb, and annoying, but he also made George special. A Man's Work. We could also say that George still is special: he has the innate moral clarity that lets him see that killing Lennie is the right thing to do. Let's contextualize this, Shmoopers: when George kills Lennie, it's a kind of euthanasia, or mercy.

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In the end, the protagonist is relieved that the elephant killed a man, because it gave him the legal right to kill the elephant. But the protagonist did not kill the elephant to protect the village or because it was the right thing to do. He states that “Legally I had done the right thing,” (Orwell 9) but morally he did not.

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Andrew Browning Shooting An Elephant George Orwell George Orwell immediately begins the essay by first claiming his perspective on British Imperialism. He claims that it is evil and he is fully against the oppressors, the British. Though he is a British officer himself at the time in Burma, he feels a certain hatred and guilt towards himself, his empire, and the “evil-spirited little beasts.

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